Skip to main content
Parkridge Medical Center
Average ER Wait Time
Checking ER Wait Time
The feed could not be reached
Retry?
--
mins

Talking to Your Doctor About Chickenpox

You have a unique medical history. It is important to talk with your doctor about your personal risk factors and/or experience with chickenpox. By talking openly and regularly with your doctor, you can take an active role in your care.

Here are some tips that will make it easier for you to talk to your doctor:

  • Bring someone else with you. It helps to have another person hear what is said and think of questions to ask.
  • Write your questions ahead of time so you don't forget them.
  • Write down the answers you get. Make sure you understand what you are hearing. Ask for information to be repeated, if necessary.
  • Don't be afraid to ask questions. Ask where you can find more information about what you are discussing. You have a right to know.
  • Should I be tested to see if I have immunity to chickenpox?
  • After possible exposure to chickenpox, what is the incubation period?
  • How long is someone contagious after they have contracted the disease?
  • How do I know if my immune system is suppressed?
  • Should I be vaccinated against chickenpox?
  • At what age can my child be vaccinated against chickenpox?
  • What over-the-counter medications can I give my child for itching, pain, and fever relief?
  • Are there any medications I should not give my child?
  • If I’m at risk for severe disease, what medications can I take to help prevent complications?
    • What are the benefits/side effects of these medications?
    • Will these medications interact with other medications, over-the-counter products, dietary or herbal supplements that I am already taking?
  • At what point should I seek medical care for possible complications of chickenpox?
  • How can I best keep the blisters from scarring?
  • I’m pregnant or planning on getting pregnant in the near future. Are there any special precautions I should take?
  • What precautions should I take if I’m traveling abroad?
  • How long do I need to keep my child isolated after he/she has contracted chickenpox?
  • Are there any possible long-term complications from chickenpox?

Revision Information

  • Chickenpox. American Academy of Family Physicians Family Doctor website. Available at: http://familydoctor.org/familydoctor/en/diseases-conditions/chickenpox.html. Updated May 2010. Accessed February 29, 2016.

  • Chickenpox. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. Updated September 8, 2015. Accessed February 29, 2016.

  • Chickenpox (varicella). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/chickenpox. Updated November 18, 2014. Accessed February 29, 2016.

  • McCarter-Spaulding DE. Varicella infection in pregnancy. J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2001;30(6):667-73.

  • Levin MJ. Varicella vaccination of immunocompromised children. J Infect Dis. 2008;197 Suppl 2:S200-S206.

  • Niederhauser VP. Varicella: the vaccine and the public health debate. Nurse Pract. 1999;(3):74-76.

The health information in this Health Library is provided by a third party. Parkridge Health System does not in any way create the content of this information. It is provided solely for informational purposes. It does not constitute medical advice and is not intended to be a substitute for proper medical care provided by a physician. Always consult with your doctor for appropriate examinations, treatment, testing, and care recommendations. Do not rely on information on this site as a tool for self-diagnosis. If you have a medical emergency, call 911.